University of Maryland

College Park

Area A – Stormwater Management

1. Stormwater Report Follow-up

The University of Maryland Environmental Finance Center recently reviewed College Park’s priorities for planning and implementing stormwater improvements, in part to support compliance of with the Municipal Separated Storm Sewer System (MS4) permit issued by the State. The University may be able to collaborate on the development and implementation of all or part of an integrated water resource management plan for College Park, including entrepreneurial opportunities for green roofs, green walls, downspout disconnects, rain barrels, rain harvesting, rain gardens, swales, tree canopy enhancements, other green scaping and water-retaining methods with a goal of mimicking forest hydrology for the city. Students could study co-benefits related to climate change, energy cost-reductions, aesthetic improvements, property value increase, and economic development and job support, and analyze cost reductions through integration with transportation and other infrastructural improvements (e.g., complete streets, buried power lines, local generation of clean energy).

2. Guilford Run study/LIDC

The Low Impact Development Center proposed a study of Guilford Run on the southern border of campus, with the goal of improving water quality by modernizing stormwater management facilities. The University can help support the development of such a study, and/or otherwise engage in collaboration on the protection and restoration of the Guilford Run Watershed, which flows from Adelphi Road to the Northeast Branch of the Anacostia River.

3. Baltimore Avenue and Knox

The block of Baltimore Avenue/Route One between Lehigh and Knox Road is one of the more flood-prone of the business community. Since it is state property, efforts must be coordinated with the Maryland State Highway Administration. The area is a pipe-shed that captures much of the downhill flow from streets and parking lots above the storm drains, and the pipe size is not large enough to handle the flow during significant storm events.

Area B – Carbon Footprint

4. Sustainability Plan Follow-up

The City of College Park voted to adopt and implement a 2015 plan that maps out a strategy for sustainability. Embedded in the plan are a number of measures that city operations could implement that would reduce the jurisdiction’s carbon footprint. Most, if not all, cost money and therefore might benefit from a financing strategy and/or a business process for implementation.

5. Graduate student project/CBE Green app

The Low Impact Development Center proposed a study of Guilford Run on the southern border of campus, with the goal of improving water quality by modernizing stormwater management facilities. The University can help support the development of such a study, and/or otherwise engage in collaboration on the protection and restoration of the Guilford Run Watershed, which flows from Adelphi Road to the Northeast Branch of the Anacostia River.

6. Guilford Run study/LIDC

The block of Baltimore Avenue/Route One between Lehigh and Knox Road is one of the more flood-prone of the business community. Since it is state property, efforts must be coordinated with the Maryland State Highway Administration. The area is a pipe-shed that captures much of the downhill flow from streets and parking lots above the storm drains, and the pipe size is not large enough to handle the flow during significant storm events.

7. Graduate student group – website to facilitate

As part of a School of Public Policy course that employed a competitive process for doing positive actions in support of a community, a cohort of graduate students used all fifty projects identified by the University of Maryland-neighboring communities as a linchpin for promotion of engagement by students.

Area C – Zero Waste

8. Promoting Anti-litter Campaign

Most bars and restaurants in College Park do not recycle for a variety of reasons. The Student Government Association Sustainability Committee is working with the College Park Committee for a Better Environment to explore how to increase or maximize business recycling, beginning with some of the more popular collegiate bars.

9. Bars and Restaurant Recycling

A few municipalities in Prince George’s County have begun composting programs, most notably Cheverly and University Park. College Park is interested in beginning such a program to complement its existing yard waste program to reduce tipping fees at landfills and increase the use of food waste as a resource.

10. Food Composting Review

The block of Baltimore Avenue/Route One between Lehigh and Knox Road is one of the more flood-prone of the business community. Since it is state property, efforts must be coordinated with the Maryland State Highway Administration. The area is a pipe-shed that captures much of the downhill flow from streets and parking lots above the storm drains, and the pipe size is not large enough to handle the flow during significant storm events.

11. PAYT support for consideration and potential implementation of best practices

The block of Baltimore Avenue/Route One between Lehigh and Knox Road is one of the more flood-prone of the business community. Since it is state property, efforts must be coordinated with the Maryland State Highway Administration. The area is a pipe-shed that captures much of the downhill flow from streets and parking lots above the storm drains, and the pipe size is not large enough to handle the flow during significant storm events.